Slow-to-evolve FDA regulations could holdback 3D printing of food

Slow-to-evolve FDA regulations could holdback 3D printing of food.

Investing in 3D printing could open new markets and generate huge cost savings for food manufacturers and retailers, but first companies must overcome potential regulatory and legal hurdles, many of which are not yet identified, warn food and drug lawyers with the firm Venable in Washington, D.C. The growth potential of 3D printing is “unlimited” for pioneers in the food industry, said Claudia Lewis, a food and drug lawyer with Venable in Washington, D.C. She explained to Food Navigator-USA that 3D printing could one day be used to create on demand customized food for people with special dietary needs, such as pregnant women, athletes or those who are managing health conditions, such as diabetes. It could enable food service providers to more easily substitute vegan or vegetarian options for animal proteins or create novelty items with personalized messages or shapes. It could even be used in specialized environments, such as outer space or schools without full kitchens. The technology also could generate huge cost savings for food companies by eliminating the need for giant manufacturing facilities filled hundreds of workers operating multiple machines that prepare, package and transport food, added Heili Kim, a food and drug lawyer who works with Lewis at Venable in Washington, D.C. She explained firms could set up a 3D printer in a GMP-compliant building and print food with only four or five workers………… Read

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